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Renamed Or "Missing" External Drive Stops Backup

Applies to:
  • CrashPlan PRO
  • CrashPlan PROe

Overview

The CrashPlan app locates files and folders using their full file paths. If the location, name, or letter of an external drive changes, the file path of any files on that drive change as well. When the file paths change, CrashPlan handles these files and folders differently and may stop backing them up.

This article explains how to fix issues related to backing up external drives when the drive's name or letter has changed.

Diagnosing

If you are affected by this issue, you may see:

Solution 1: Verify file selection

Start a file verification scan to force the CrashPlan app to check for the drive at its original location.

  1. Go to Settings > Backup.
  2. Near the Verify selection every setting, click Now.
    Click Now to verify your file selection

Solution 2: Rename external drive

If the CrashPlan app can't find the external drive at its original location, we recommend changing the external drive's name or drive letter to its original state.

Step 1: Find the drive's original name or letter

If you are backing up files that are on an external drive:

  1. Go to Settings > General.
  2. Check Show full paths on Backup tab.
  3. Click Save.
  4. Go to Backup.
  5. Look at Files to view the full file path (including the drive name or letter) of your files.

If you are backing up files to an external drive:

  1. Go to Destinations > Folders.
  2. From the list of available folders, select the name of the backup location.
    The full file path and drive name or letter is displayed on the right.

Step 2: Rename the drive to its original state

Change the external drive's name or drive letter to its original state:

Windows 10

  1. Right-click the Start button.
  2. Click Disk Management.
  3. Right-click the drive you want to change and select Change Drive Letter and Paths.
  4. Click Change.
  5. Near Assign the following drive letter:, select the original drive letter.
  6. Click OK.
  7. Click Yes to confirm the change when prompted with a warning message.

Windows 8

  1. Press Windows key + W to open search.
  2. Type Disk Management.
  3. Select Create and format hard disk partitions.
  4. Right-click the external drive and select Change Drive Letter and Paths.
  5. Click Change.
  6. Choose the original drive letter and press OK. Click Yes to confirm the warning.

Windows 7

  1. Click Start > Control Panel > System and Security > Administrative Tools.
  2. Double-click Computer Management.
    If prompted, enter an administrator password or confirmation.
  3. Click Disk Management from the left.
  4. Right-click the drive you want to change and select Change Drive Letter and Paths.
  5. Click Change, then click Assign the following drive letter.
  6. Choose the original drive letter and press OK.
  7. Click Yes to confirm the warning.

Windows Vista

  1. Click Start > Control Panel > System and Maintenance > Administrative Tools.
  2. Double-click Computer Management.
    If prompted, enter an administrator password or confirmation.
  3. Click Disk Management from the Navigation area.
  4. Right-click on the drive you want to change and select Change Drive Letter and Paths.
  5. Click Change, then click Assign the following drive letter.
  6. Choose the original drive letter and press Ok.
  7. Click Yes to confirm the warning.

Windows XP

  1. Log on as Administrator.
  2. Click Start > Control Panel > Performance and Maintenance.
  3. Click Administrative Tools.
  4. Double-click Computer Management.
  5. Click Disk Management in the left.
  6. Right-click the drive that you want to assign a drive letter to, and then click Change Drive Letter and Paths.
  7. Click Change.
  8. Choose the original drive letter and click Ok.

OS X

  1. Open the Finder.
  2. Select the drive in the left sidebar and press enter.
  3. Rename the drive in the name field.
  4. Press Enter.

Linux

Identify the unique identifier (the UUID) of the drive, then assign the appropriate path (mount point) to that drive by editing the fstab file at /etc/fstab (not /lib/init/fstab).

  1. Make a backup copy of fstab:
    sudo copy /etc/fstab /etc/fstab.saf
  2. Open fstab with an editor:
    sudo nano /etc/fstab
  3. Change the mount point of the drive in question.
    Records in fstab are as follows:
    UUID=<unique identifier> </path/to/mount/point> <file-system-type> <options> <dump flag> <pass flag>
  4. Save and exit.
  5. Mount the drive at the new path:
    sudo mount -a